Granny Anny is on the run…

and Granny is trying to tell a story…

Pemandian Watu Gede, a Singosari Kingdom’s ancient bath

with 4 comments


So, I decided to do a travel blog as well.  It won’t have a lot of posts like my food blog, I think.  But, when I travel somewhere occasionally, I’ll be sure to post pictures and a little blurb (don’t take it literally, you know what I mean :P).

I had meant to start blogging about my recent travels to Indonesia, Hongkong and Guang Zhou first.  But, since I just wrote about the Indonesian yellow chicken soup, Soto, in my food blog, which referred to the mortar and pestle in my travel blog, I decided that I would blog about Singosari first.  Why Singosari?  Well, because, I am the writer!  ha ha… It’s because the story would lead us to the mortar and pestle…

It happened last year.  I was so ignorant as an Indonesian.  All my life when I lived there, I never ventured outside my mom’s wall.  I did not know that just 10 minutes away from my mom’s, there were many historical places that are worth visiting.  Thanks to my adventurous hubby, we decided to drive around Singosari and check things out.

So we went deep inside the jungle… err.. what was jungle before.  First we hit the Pemandian Watu Gede, or in English, that would be Big Stone Bath (pardon my translation – it would be translated as what the words mean.)  Pemandian means bath place; Watu (Javanese) means stone; and Gede (Javanese) means big.

The man who manned the bath mentioned that this bath was a place for the princess(es) of Singosari Kingdom to take their baths.  The bath was also opened for the ladies in the Royalty.  This was strictly ladies’ bath place.  Men were prohibited from entering the area.  Any man who got caught entering this bath or the vicinity, would be punished by beheading.   The evidence was the three big stones sitting on the root of the ancient tree, to the left of the pool.

The big stone in the middle is where they would have beheaded any man got caught in this area.  The stone to the right has several deep indentations.  This is the stone where they sharpened the knife or sword they used for beheading.   Interesting eh?  I would think that if they beheaded a man right there, the blood would have tainted the pool?

The pool itself measures about 10 x 20 meters.  The water is supplied by an artesian well underneath the ancient tree to the left of the bath.  The majority of the water flow from the artesian well is now diverted to provide water supply for the rest of the residents in Singosari and surrounding towns.

This is where the artesian water comes out of the ground.

The pool was engineered so that there were water spouts around the pool. You can see from the picture below, the remnants of where the water spout had been.

Also, they used to have small statues surrounding the pool.  I believe it was a Garuda sitting on top of a monkey’s head, where the water come out of the monkey’s nostrils (according to the man who manned the place.  I cannot confirm this, and only found one blog that mentioned about the Garuda).

What was left there now was a disfigured statue on the left hand side of the pool. You can barely see the Garuda figure.  However, you can see the lower part was some sort of animal head, with the definite nostrils.  I was told that the rest of the statues were put in the Trowulan museum in Mojokerto for safe keeping.

So, that’s my little blurb about the Pemandian Watu Gede.   What do you think?

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Written by Anny

July 11, 2010 at 7:10 pm

4 Responses

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  1. I love it! Congratulations for opening your travel blog! Keep it up.

    Olive Tree

    July 19, 2010 at 1:40 am

    • Thanks Lyn! Ini kalo engga masak.. nganggur2 bisa ngetik2… hehehe

      axokuaci

      July 19, 2010 at 1:47 am

  2. mohon ijin untuk share di group Facebook : Singosari .. ulasannya good

    Dayat Baxtiar

    January 2, 2016 at 2:07 am

    • Boleh boleh saja :). Terima kasih untuk membaca blog saya.

      Anny

      January 2, 2016 at 5:08 am


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